Development

Building git from source on El Capitan (OS X 10.11)

Development Git OS X

A quick post today because I didn’t find an easily accessible reference for building Git from source on Mac OS X El Capitan, and I needed to. Maybe there’s another post out there just like this one, but I didn’t find it, so maybe this will be useful in future for those who similarly come up short on Google. After you’ve cloned the source from https://github.com/git/git, open up a terminal. I’m assuming you’ve got Xcode installed, and that you’ve already installed the command line tools - if not, execute this on the command line now:

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[self.sourceTree exit];

Four and a half years ago, I decided to write a Mac tool for Git and Mercurial, which I’d eventually name SourceTree (aside: names are hard, and I was quite pleased with this one). I wasn’t happy with the Mac apps that were out there at the time and thought I could write something that fit my needs better, and by extension the needs of other developers who felt like I did.

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Auto Layout and tab ordering

Because SourceTree has continued to support versions of Mac OS X back to 10.6 (Snow Leopard), we’ve still been using the ‘springs and struts’ approach to user interface layout up to now; we couldn’t adopt the newer Auto Layout without restricting support to 10.7+. So I’ve only just started experimenting with Auto Layout recently, and I ended up getting stuck for a while on something that seemed like it should be really simple, and yet I couldn’t find any hard information about it on Stack Overflow or via Google: how to specify tab ordering.

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Friends don't let friends use ClickOnce

I’ve had a fair amount of experience with Windows-based installers in the past, including non-Microsoft Installer based systems like NSIS and the open source WiX, but most of the time I’d been working with one-off installers for native code projects, like the Ogre3D SDKs. I pride myself in not pre-judging the best toolset to use for any given problem - which is why I switch languages a lot - so when I came to write SourceTree for Windows, which is based on .

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What open source taught me about management

I was a manager of developers in an organisation for a few years, and during that period I learned a lot. But if I’m honest, I learned far more about being a manager from leading a large open source project for 10 years, because that taught me a lot about what makes developers tick. Of course, I’ve always been a developer myself too, but you often don’t think that clearly about your own motivations.

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Software industry archetypes : nautical edition

For no particular reason except that a few of these occurred to me while relaxing this week on our ample coastline… The free diver Plumbs dangerous depths with little or no assistance or safety gear, far from the glow of natural light. Examples: Kernel programmers, graphics programmers The jet skier Skims along the surface covering a lot of ground: agile but also capricious, never staying too long. Try not to get caught in their wake.

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Review: OGRE 3D 1.7 Application Development Cookbook

It’s always gratifying, and a little weird, when I see books being written about OGRE - it just serves to illustrate (if any more evidence was needed) how far the project has come since I created that first ‘vertex coloured triangle’ rendering test on my home computer 12 years ago. I’ve been retired from the project for a while now, but I still get asked my opinion about things sometimes, and Packt were nice enough to send me a copy of this new book by Ilya Grinblat and Alex Peterson, OGRE 3D 1.

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104 keys: who needs them anyway?

I fired up my desktop Windows PC for the first time in a while recently, and the first thing I realised is that I absolutely hated the keyboard. This was nothing to do with the slight differences between the PC and Mac keyboard layouts, the latter of which I’ve become more accustomed over the last couple of years, nor was it about whether the keys were mechanical or scissor switched, or any such nuance.

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See you at WWDC!

Apple kept everyone on tenterhooks this year by announcing WWDC 2012 very late - the second latest announcement ever in fact. Like many other people (11,000 of them I hear, which is alarming given that there are only 5,000 tickets to the event) I signed up to WWDC Alerts, which sent me an SMS message while I was having lunch, only a few minutes after the tickets went on sale. That I was lucky enough to bag myself a ticket has a lot to do with that - about 90 minutes later, they were all gone - so big thanks to fellow Brits Anthony Herron and Aaron Wardle for running that, completely free of charge too.

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Why I'm a software developer

How often do you stop and think about why it is you do what you do for a living? Maybe it’s a mid-life crisis thing, but of late I’m acutely aware of the finite nature of time, and that there are an infinite number of ways I could spend that time. I’m also aware that ‘software developers’ are a quite diverse bunch of people, despite the persistent stereotype of math geeks huddled around technical toys talking in obscure acronyms (OK, we do that too).

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